Man putting a ballot into a voting box - USA

Maricopa County will begin mailing early ballots on July 8 for Scottsdale’s Aug. 4 primary, giving Scottsdale voters their first chance to cast votes in this year’s local and state elections.

All registered voters will have the opportunity to cast ballots in Scottsdale’s crowded mayoral and city council races. Voters registered with a specific political party will also be able to vote in their party’s state legislative and Congressional primaries.

Scottsdale voters who are not affiliated with a political party and are on the early voting list will not automatically receive a ballot by mail, according to the city.

In order to receive a ballot, those voters must contact the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office to request a political party’s ballot or a Scottsdale-only ballot. They can call 602-506-1511 or go to  recorder.maricopa.gov/earlyvotingballot/earlyvotingballotrequest.aspx.

The deadline to register for the  primary is July 6 and the deadline to request a mail-in ballot is July 24. The last day to mail back a mail-in ballot is July 29.

Voters in Maricopa County can also cast their vote in person at any polling center from July 8 to Aug. 4. A complete list of polling centers is available at BeBallotReady.Vote. Weekend in-person voting will be available starting on July 25. 

The primary election will likely shrink the fields in the packed local races in Scottsdale, where five candidates are running for mayor and nine are running for three City Council seats.

But there is a possibility that one or more candidates could be elected outright in the primary.

According to the City of Scottsdale, a candidate must receive over 50 percent of all legal votes cast to be elected outright in the primary.

If no candidate receives a majority of votes in the primary, the top six vote-getters in the council race and top two candidates in the mayoral election will advance to the Nov. 3 general election.

 

Mayoral candidates 

Lisa Borowsky, former one-term Scottsdale councilwoman. She is endorsed by the Arizona Free Enterprise Club.

Suzanne Klapp, current three-term Scottsdale councilwoman. She is endorsed by Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane, Maricopa County Supervisor Bill Gates, Chandler Mayor Kevin Hartke, Gilbert Mayor Jenn Daniels, Surprise Mayor Skip Hall, Phoenix Councilmen Jim Waring and Sal DiCiccio, and Mesa Councilman Kevin Thompson

Virginia Korte is a current two-term Scottsdale councilwoman. Korte is endorsed by the Police Officers of Scottsdale Association (POSA), United Scottsdale Firefighters Association; Sam Campana, former Scottsdale mayor; former Councilmen Jim Bruner, Greg Bielli, David N. Smith and Paul Messinger; Councilwoman Linda Milhaven; Jan Dolan, former Scottsdale city manager.

Korte is also endorsed by Susan Galpin-Tyree, Judicial Appointments Advisory Board member; Janie Ellis, Cattle Track Arts Compound; Bob and Judy Frost, former Scottsdale recreation superintendent; Jan Gehler, former Scottsdale Community College president; Grady Gammage Jr.: Steve Helm, Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce board of directors; Jeanette Griswold, former Scottsdale Chamber of Commerce board member; and community activist Denny Brown.

Outside of Scottsdale, Korte is endorsed by Mark Mitchell, Tempe mayor; Neil Giuliano, former Tempe mayor; Terry Goddard, former Arizona attorney general; Scott Smith, former Mesa mayor; and others.

Bob Littlefield, former three-term Scottsdale councilman, is endorsed by Protect Our Preserve and the Coalition of Greater Scottsdale.

David Ortega, former one-term Scottsdale councilman. He is endorsed by Dr. Bodo Diehn, former Chair Scottsdale Environmental Quality Advisory Board, and former City Councilman Tom Silverman.

 

City Council candidates

Michael Auerbach, a 10-year Scottsdale resident and small-business owner, is endorsed by John Shadegg, former Congressman; Arizona Free Enterprise Club; County Supervisor Steve Chucri; State Representative Shawnna Bolick; and State Representative Nancy Barto.

Tammy Caputi, a 20-year Scottsdale resident and owner of Yale Electric West, is endorsed by the Police Officers of Scottsdale Association (POSA) and United Scottsdale Firefighters Association.

Bill Crawford, a longtime downtown Scottsdale business owner and resident, is endorsed by Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane; State Sen. Michelle Ugenti-Rita; State Rep. Jay Lawrence; Paul Messenger, former Scottsdale councilman; Betty Drake, former Scottsdale councilwoman; Wayne Ecton, former Scottsdale councilman; Phoenix Councilman Sal DiCiccio; Vernon Parker, former Paradise Valley mayor; and Joy MacLean, former Paradise Valley councilwoman.

Tom Durham is a Scottsdale resident and lawyer. He is endorsed by Councilwoman Kathy Littlefield; Mary Manross, former Scottsdale mayor; Coalition of Greater Scottsdale; Marilynn Atkinson, Old Town Merchant’s Association; Kate Conway, former Protect Our Preserve director; Kathy Howard, former Scottsdale Historic Preservation commissioner; Christie Kinchen, Scottsdale Historic Preservation commissioner; Sonnie Kirtley, Coalition of Greater Scottsdale executive director; Howard Myers, Protect Our Preserve president; Joanne C. Phillips, retired Arizona State deputy associate superintendent of Special Education; Patricia Van Cleave, Protect Our Preserve director.

Betty Janik is a 15-year Scottsdale resident and former president of the Coalition of Greater Scottsdale advocacy group. Janik is endorsed by Councilwoman Kathy Littlefield; Councilwoman Solange Whitehead; Mary Manross, former Scottsdale mayor; Carla, McDowell Sonoran Preserve pioneer; Tom Silverman, former Scottsdale councilman; Coalition of Greater Scottsdale; Marilynn Atkinson, Old Town Merchant’s Association; Kate Conway, former Protect Our Preserve director; Kathy Howard, Ph.D   Former Scottsdale Historic Preservation commissioner.

Janik also is endorsed by William Howard, Ph.D., former Scottsdale Transportation Commission chair; Susan Kauffman,  Troon Ridge Estates II HOA president; Christie Kinchen Scottsdale Historic Preservation commissioner; Sonnie Kirtley, Coalition of Greater Scottsdale executive director; Howard Myers, Protect Our Preserve president; Joanne C. Phillips, retired Arizona State deputy associate superintendent of Special Education; Patricia Van Cleave, Protect Our Preserve director; Janet Wilson, Committee for the Preservation of Old Town Scottsdale chair.

Becca Linnig, past president of the Scotts-dale Area Association of Realtors and 20-year resident is endorsed by D. Patrick Lewis, immediate past president of the Arizona Association of Realtors, and David Lester, McDowell Mountain constable.

John Little is a former Scottsdale city manager. Little is endorsed by Police Officers of Scottsdale Association (POSA); Steve Randall and Karl Kierlieber, former Scottsdale fire chiefs; Greg Bielli, Wayne Ecton, Don Prior, former Scottsdale Councilmembers; Vernon Parker, former Paradise Valley mayor; Don Logan, founding member of Community Celebrating Diversity; Julie Cieniawski, past president of Scottsdale Education Association; and Dennis Rodriguez past president of the North East Scottsdale Property Owners Association.

Little also is endorsed by Rev. Phil Carlson, former president and CEO of Scottsdale Chamber of Commerce; Gary Shapiro, co-founder of Scottsdale Leadership; Frank Jacobson, Scottsdale Center for the Arts past president and CEO; Jan Dolan, Former Scottsdale city manager; and Eileen Rogers, Scottsdale History Makers Hall of Fame inductee.

Kevin Maxwell, a technology analyst for State Farm and former Scottsdale Airport Advisory commissioner. He is endorsed by Councilwoman Linda Milhaven; Sam Campana, former Scottsdale mayor; Planning Commissioner Larry Kush; Paula Sturgeon; former SUSD Governing Board Member George Jackson; and Denny Brown and Melinda Gulick, co-chairs of the Yes to Children pro-SUSD override PAC.

Guy Phillips is a current two-term Scottsdale councilman. 

 

Other elections

Scottsdale voters will also have the chance to vote in Republican and Democratic primaries for state legislative races.

 

Legislative District 23 House

Incumbent Reps. Jay Lawrence, Scottsdale, and John Kavanagh, Fountain Hills, are running for re-election in LD23, which covers much of Scottsdale.

The incumbents face Joseph Chaplik, a Scottsdale Republican and president of Joseph Bernard Investment Real Estate. 

 

LD23 Senate

Incumbent Sen. Michelle Ugenti-Rita faces one challenger in August.

Alexander Kolodin owns a Phoenix-based law firm and has collaborated in the past with the conservative Goldwater Institute.

 

LD24 House 

In LD 24, which covers Phoenix and parts of southern Scottsdale, incumbent Reps. Amish Shah and Jennifer Longdon are the only two candidates to qualify in the Democratic primary and no Republican candidates filed for the ballot. Republicans David Alger and Robyn Cushman registered as write-in candidates.

 

LD24 Senate

Sen. Lela Alston, a Phoenix Democrat who has served numerous terms in both the House and Senate since 1977 faces U.S. Army veteran Ryan Starzyk in the Democratic primary. 

No Republicans will appear on the ballot, but Michael Ray registered as a write-in candidate.